Ardenne Abbey

History

As early as 1945, a registration process was launched to help the owners to restore all the buildings using war damages compensation. In 1947, all the buildings which were not registered as Historical Places in 1918 became listed buildings. Emergency building work started. On the night of May 22nd/23rd 1947, when scaffolding was already in place, the southwest corner of the abbey collapsed, as a result of the bombing. The first two bays were pulled down in the fall.

Until the 1990s, one of the major concerns when restoring the Abbey was to give it a role matching its heritage status. From the years 1970 onwards, ideas and projects abounded: leisure centre, school of architecture, town hall, parish church, crematorium, hotel… All these projects failed.

In the early 1990s, the Lower Normandy Regional Council purchased the whole site of the Abbey and launched a Franco-American cultural exchange project. In 1994, the restoration of the Flour House, the stables, Bayeux gateway and the main abode was launched. In 1995, when the Normandy Scholars Program came to an abrupt end, the Regional Council offered the IMEC (Institute for Contemporary Publishing Archives) the opportunity to use the site to house its collections and activities.

1949, projet de mise en valeur des vestiges anciens par un aménagement végétal, Marcel Poutaraud, Médiathèque de l’architecture et du patrimoine

1949, projet de mise en valeur des vestiges anciens par un aménagement végétal, Marcel Poutaraud,
Médiathèque de l’architecture et du patrimoine